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mattm I'veowned the unit for about 2 years now, and I've never changed the filter. The filter can be washed in warm, soapy water, rinsed in fresh water, and air dried and it's good as new.

2019-10-24 09:21:29 Helpful (0)
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Q: Excuse me for ignorance. Where's the cotton in this atomizer?

Asked by coutmelo on 2019-07-01 12:34:41

mattm This is a non-wicked vapouriser, and as such doesn't have a cotton wick. Instead the substance to be vapourised contacts the thin walled quartz that isolates the element from the liquid/resin. This is theoretically superior to a wicked system, because nickel and chrome at high temperatures can act as catalysts and cause chemical reactions when brought into contact with or organic compounds such as found in resins and vape liquids, possibly producing dangerous byproducts. With a quartz envelope keeping the heating element isolated from the resin/liquid, such catalytic reactions are prevented.

2019-08-26 10:46:42 Helpful (0)
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mattm Don'tworry about it. The electronics of the 100V and 240V versions are the same, and you only need to make sure you've got a suitable plug on the end.

2019-08-22 06:55:40 Helpful (1)
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mattm TL/DR;To supply 500mA of charge current, use a 2500 ohm resistor between pin P and ground. Explanation: The 800mA rating of this unit means that it will supply a maximum current of 800mA, and at full current would take about an hour to charge an 800mAh cell, or about 10 hours to charge an 8000mAh cell. For a 500mAh LiPo you ideally will charge at no more than 500mA to preserve the life of the cell. To limit the current in your application you'll need to consult the datasheet and provide the correct charge rate programming resistors. The datasheet is linked on this page. The charge current supplied by this board is described by the function RPROG= 1000/ICHR, and as supplied the board has a 10K resistor, meaning it will supply 100mA. That is: RPROG = 1000/0.1 RPROG = 10000 = 10K which is the value of R2 soldered onto the board. If you want to charge at a higher rate, you have to place a resistor parallel to R2 - ie. connect as resistor from pin P to ground, which will place the resistor in parallel to R2. If you want 500mA charge rate: 500 mA = 0.5 A RPROG = 1000/0.5 RPROG = 2000 So, you need to choose a resistor which when placed in parallel with R2 gives a value of 2K ohm resistance. Parallel resistprs are Rtotal = (R1*R2)/(R1 R2) We know R2 is 10K, so we need to solve for R1, which you can do albegraically, or just use a parallel resistor calculator. I can't link to it, but searching for Parallel Resistor calculator will get you results. You'll get the value

2019-08-22 06:54:52 Helpful (1)
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mattm Thecircuitry on the PCB is designed to automatically handle either 110V or 220/240V, and would probably work across a wider range of voltages if required. The only difference between a 240V and 110V version is the plug, and there's no circuitry in the plug.

2019-08-22 05:47:32 Helpful (1)
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